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Building a hex flower weather table in Roll20?

1642117961

Edited 1642118022
snuh
Pro
Any suggestions for building a hex flower style weather table in Roll20? Essentially I want to rebuild this functionality in R20. For now I'm just rolling by hand, but it would be nice to automate it in the system. The way that this hex flower weather table works is you roll 2d6 to initialize the weather position, and then each day roll a new 2d6 which will tell you what direction on the board the weather marker shifts. Importantly, some edges will "wrap around" to the opposite side of the row, while others don't. This means it's stupid simple to use with 2d6 and a token on a board, but it actually seems a bit tricky to do it programmatically in Roll20. I certainly don't need the visual board, I'd just like to be able to click a "Next Day" button and have it return "Pleasantly Warm" or whatever. Thoughts?
1642169436
timmaugh
Pro
API Scripter
Interesting idea. I can see ways to do it, but a couple of questions will help clarify: The movement hex has numbers that span a corner -- the number 8 spans a corner that bridges the top of the hex with the upper right face; 7 does the same for the lower right and bottom. Does this mean you get to choose which of those directions to move in? If it's not a choice, what mechanic would decide it? Also on the Movement Hex, do the numbers 5,6, and 11 constitute a face (a face without spanning a corner), while the 9 and 10 represent landing on a line (to make the weather repeat), or are all of these numbers "line" results? Some positions in the map have a line outside of the outer face. What does this line represent? There is no indication that the map should repeat (as if you could go off the bottom and enter at the top). That would destroy the otherwise-gradual shift from one position to another (going from Hot to Extreme Cold, for instance), so I can't think they are boundaries limiting your movement. But neither are they repeated exactly in the seasons, so they don't seem decorative, either. What function do they serve?
1642170496
timmaugh
Pro
API Scripter
Looking at it again, maybe the external lines *are* meant to deter wrapping in that direction, specifically so you don't break the gradual relation of hexes to one another. In that case, I could see the mechanic of having 2 possible moves available from a hex (where a result wraps a corner of the Move Hex) make it so that you would still move even if you couldn't wrap. But that would make me wonder what to do in the lower left of Spring and the upper left of Autumn (where a corner -- and therefore both potential lines of movement) is restricted. Would being on this hex and rolling in a direction you couldn't go (assuming my interpretation of the rules for this chart are correct)... would that result in another "repeated day" of weather?
1642174199
snuh
Pro
Hi! I have no idea why the original author colored the Movement Hex in four quadrants because it makes it confusing. The quadrants are meaningless, disregard them. Simply move the weather in the direction of the hex face rolled. If you come to the edge of the hex flower, simply wrap around to the other side of that column. Unless there is a line along that facing - instead the roll is changed to "repeated day".
1642178455

Edited 1642185047
I put a preliminary script together. But see if it works for your needs and I will fix it up a bit.&nbsp; !wf &nbsp; &nbsp; (shows usage) !wf next &nbsp; (generates weather) !wf [spring|summer|autumn|winter] (changes season) <a href="https://gist.github.com/jimrafuse/7feb7c47797677b32f21bc2cccf66e8e" rel="nofollow">https://gist.github.com/jimrafuse/7feb7c47797677b32f21bc2cccf66e8e</a>
1642183453
timmaugh
Pro
API Scripter
That's a nifty little script there, Jim! Snuh, Jim's script looks promising as far as returning the weather and even the color coding that resembles the original hex flower. The solution that I was envisioning was, you might guess if you've been around, a metascript solution using Muler and ZeroFrame. To be clear, this would be completely separate from what Jim has mocked up for you. The difference in the approach would be that you would gain the ability to drop the returned information in other command lines (like a roll template, another script's command line, or a basic chat message), but you would lose the color formatting. (Probably. I haven't really played with injecting HTML that way... but it might work...) In any case, Jim's script looks like it gets you where you want to go, so unless you specifically need the benefits of the metascript solution I just described, I won't clutter the thread. OTOH, if you want to see what that would look like, post back and I'll see what I can put together.
1642186701
snuh
Pro
Wow, thank you both! Jim, this is 100% what I had hoped. It looks like you defined all the adjacencies for each hex so it looks up what to set the new value as based on current hexID and hex facing rolled, with an override if the hex-facing is a 'null' at that particular facing. Least I can do is proofread all the tables for gremlins! Line 50: missing bg: /* 5 */ { text : 'CLOUDY &amp;amp; WARM' , init : 10 , bg: BROWN } , Line 51: swap bg: for color: /* 6 */ { text : 'STRONG POLLEN DRIFT' , excl : '!' , sw : null , s : null , bg : BROWN } , Line 52: swap bg: for color: /* 7 */ { text : 'HEAVY RAINFALL' , excl : '!' , n : null , bg : DODGER_BLUE } , Line 85: missing excl: '!' /* 16 */ { text : 'FIERCE WIND' , excl: '1', bg : SLATE_BLUE , ne : null } , Line 99: exl typo /* 6 */ { text : 'HEAVY DOWNPOUR' , excl : '!' , init : 2 , bg : DARK_BLUE , s : null } , And as a San Franciscan, I think I'm legally required to object to the color "DODGER_BLUE". All minor stuff, great work. Thanks! It may be worth publishing a stripped-down generic version, too, for people to edit. You can use hexflower generators for all sorts of interesting procedural stuff - terrain generators, dungeon builders, etc.
1642187600
Thanks for the gremlins. The gist should be updated now.
1642203236
Gold
Forum Champion
share it in the One-Click, Community-created API scripts repository 8-) Looks useful
1642455113
snuh
Pro
Used it last night in our Darker Dungeons wilderness crawl, and it worked great. Thanks, Jim!