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Character Sheets With Sass

1557969956
Will K.
Pro
Sheet Author
Hey, I was just poking through Roll20's git hub and noticed that a few sheets that appear to use Sass.  That's exciting, I didn't know it was an option.  There's no documentation on the Roll20 wiki about it, so I was wondering if anyone has any experience using it for Roll20 character sheets.  More specifically if there were any hurdles for anyone interested in using it.
1557984598
Vince
Pro
Sheet Author
I don't believe Sass is supported on roll20 (or didn't used to be...). Which sheet(s) did you notice it being used?
1557985599
Will K.
Pro
Sheet Author
Here are the two I came across: Stars Without Number Revised Blades in the Dark
1557988044

Edited 1557988199
I don't think Roll20 itself will compile SASS to CSS.   In your examples, those look like they are source codes provided for developers that want to contribute.  In your latter example, for instance, the source are "compiled" using node.js.  You'd have to run the build script locally to build out the final product.  And the final product that would be presented to Roll20 are pure .css and .html files you see in the top directory. 
1557991877
Jakob
Pro
Sheet Author
API Scripter
It's a great help in keeping your code mode organized, especially since Roll20 CSS otherwise tends to become one monolithic unmaintainable mess... downside is you have to compile it before copy-pasting it into Roll20, 
1557992448
Andreas J.
Pro
Sheet Author
Jakob said: It's a great help in keeping your code mode organized, especially since Roll20 CSS otherwise tends to become one monolithic unmaintainable mess... downside is you have to compile it before copy-pasting it into Roll20,  Which makes the threshold for other to contibute to a sheet slightly higher, if they need to learn Sass as well. I'll maybe look into it just so I know to iuse it but doubt I gonna use it. Or is css compiled with Sass still manageable to edit without the changes being wiped by next person who wants to make changes with Sass?
1557992745
Jakob
Pro
Sheet Author
API Scripter
Andreas J. said: Jakob said: It's a great help in keeping your code mode organized, especially since Roll20 CSS otherwise tends to become one monolithic unmaintainable mess... downside is you have to compile it before copy-pasting it into Roll20,  Which makes the threshold for other to contibute to a sheet slightly higher, if they need to learn Sass as well. I'll maybe look into it just so I know to iuse it but doubt I gonna use it. Or is css compiled with Sass still manageable to edit without the changes being wiped by next person who wants to make changes with Sass? No, you need to edit the Sass code. On the other hand, CSS is a subset of Sass, so you can just write CSS in the Sass file.
1558003228
Andreas J.
Pro
Sheet Author
Jakob said: No, you need to edit the Sass code. On the other hand, CSS is a subset of Sass, so you can just write CSS in the Sass file. So if a maintainer of a sheet decided to start working on it with Sass, it would essentially increase the difficulty for other to contribute as people would need to learn Sass? If that's the case, I completely understand why there aren't too many sheets made with Sass. I mean, if someone where to make a bunch of sheets with Sass and then abandon the projects, people could technically just continue work on the CSS, but all that work would kinda be invalidated if someone where to again contribute trough the Sass framework, right?
1558004675
Jakob
Pro
Sheet Author
API Scripter
Yes, unless they backport all the changes to the Sass code. You've got a point, but this is kind of offset by the fact that Sass, if used properly, can increase the readability of the resulting code, so that someone would be more inclined to contribute. Then again, most sheets (including mine, I'm afraid) are not really written with readability in mind as a priority.
The reason one would use Sass, Less, and other preprocessor (aside from better readability as mentioned) is ease with which you can make style changes.