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D&D 5e: Diagonal Measurement of AoEs on a square grid?

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I don't know if this is the appropriate forum for this question, but it seems like the closest fit. I will be DMing my first D&D 5e game in a few weeks and have been carefully studying the rules and the Roll20 VTT system to prepare. One issue that still confounds me is the diagonal measurement of AoEs that is consistent with the simplified diagonal grid movement rule of 5e. Is there any consensus on this issue among 5e Players? Or any official rules or errata from Wizards of the Coast? Now, I really like the simplified rule; the older I get, the less inclined I am to number-crunch on the fly.  However, after reading various threads on this subject in different forums, I have come to realize that the simplified diagonal grid movement rule can really distort the concept of distance and space on a square grid; especially when you try to apply it to AoEs. When calculating a cone, for example, the number of affected squares increases when aiming diagonally. The same thing happens with diagonal squares. But the what bothers me the most is that there is no apparent difference between circles and squares.  The diagonal radiuses push beyond what would normally be the boundary of the circle; effectively warping it into a square. Thanks in advance to any light you guys can shed on this issue.
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Andreas J.
Forum Champion
Sheet Author
(Roll20 Community Code of Conduct)Intended Use The Roll20 Forums exist to discuss topics directly related to the use of the Roll20 program and Roll20 systems. Anything that more fittingly could be discussed on another website  should  be discussed there. I'd ask the question on a DnD5e focused community like /r/dndnext or SageAdvice on twitter.
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keithcurtis
Forum Champion
API Scripter
There is also rpg.stackexchange.com, which I find better organized for questions like this. Since, as Andreas J. points out, this is not the right site for questions like this, I'll go ahead and close the thread.